Robyn's Words


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Ships

I found out some information about the ships two of the Schnabels came to America on.

The Pretoria was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1897 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 12,800 gross ton ship, length 560ft x beam 62ft, straight stem, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 162-1st, 197-2nd and 2,382-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10 September 1897, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 02 December 1898. In 1908 she collided with and sank the Nipponia in thick fog off Texel and in 1910 was rebuilt to 13,234 tons and with passenger accommodation for 400-2nd class and 2,200-3rd class. On 06 December 1914 she was slightly damaged in collision with the American ship New York, when 180 miles from the Nantucket lightship, and proceeded to Hamburg for repairs. In March 1919, she was surrendered to the USA and used as a US Government transport and on 10 September 1920 was ceded to Britain and operated by Ellerman Lines. In November 1921 she was scrapped.

On 01 July 1900, Pincas (age 25) departed Hamburg, Germany on the ship Pretoria. He was a steerage (German zwischendeck means “between deck”) passenger.

The Barcelona was a Hamburg-Amerika Linie ship, originally named Arabia. She was built in 1896 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast.  She was 5,446 gross tons, her length was  398.3ft x beam 49ft, she had one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was capacity for 20-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21st Nov.1896, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg for Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore on 17th Mar.1897.  She was sold to R. Sloman in 1899, and renamed Barcelona. In May 1903 she was chartered back to Hamburg America Line. They eventually repurchased her from Sloman in 1907 and she continued her North Atlantic voyages In June 1914 she started her first New York to the Mediterranean crossing, on route to the Black Sea and was seized by Italy in 1915. She was renamed Ancona, and used by Italian owners until 1924 when she was scrapped.
In 1903, at the age of 18, Manes Schnabel departed Hamburg, Germany on 13 May on the  ship Barcelona.  He was a steerage (German zwischendeck means “between deck”) passenger.


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Nachman Schnabel

Nachman Schnabel and Blima Gutherz.

The farthest I can trace the Schnabel line (so far) is to Nachman Schnabel, and his wife Blima Gutherz.  They were my grear-great grandparents.  They lived in what is now modern-day Ukraine, in a town called Kolomyya.  Sometimes their names are anglicized to Nathan and Beatrice.  Blima was born around 1846, and they had at least 6 children.

Jakob Leib Schnabel

Jakob was born in 1866 and died in 1867.

Dawid Mendel Schnabel

Dawid was born in 1870 and died in 1871.

Feige Sura Schnabel

Feige was born in 1872.  Her information past 1872 is unknown.

Pincas Schnabel

Pincas was born in 1874.  He was my great-grandfather and immigrated to New York.

Ester Schnabel

Ester was born in 1880 and died  in 1881.

Manes Schnabel

Manes was born in 1885 and immigrated to New York.


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November!

SO, its November already!  Wow.  It seems like I blink and a month flies by.

In November, many people write a novel (NANOWRIMO) or knit a sweater (NANOSWEMO).  This month, I am going to try and work on my family tree every day.  It turns out that October is Family History Month, but oh well.  November it is for me.

I haven’t worked on my family tree for a while, which is good because it allowed time for Ancestry.com to add a bunch of new databases and indexes.  Hopefully I will have records and photos from NYC coming my way this month.

I’m starting with the Schnabel (my mom’s father’s) side of the family.  I know more about them than others, so I am trying to round out everything I can figure out online or through the mail.  I hope next year to go to NYC and find out bits about both sides of my family that I can’t find online.

When I find interesting information out, I’ll share it here!


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IDEALA Final Project

Instruction:

A one-shot, face-to-face, in-library, 2 hour “brief” for five-twenty upper level/graduate students, covering Library and research tools and sites, specifically for their in-class brief and future research. These military members have either completed or are about to start, their masters coursework at a military university.  The brief will be conducted in a small computer lab, with computers for each student and the instructor’s computer projected onto a smart board.  Students will utilize their computers, pen, and paper, while the instructor briefs using PowerPoint slides and modeling computer searches through the smart board projection.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

  • Identify potential sources for information and productivity
  • Assess quality and relevance of search results and information
  • Understand copyright, documentation styles, and source citing

Assessment:

At the beginning of the brief, have students write a one minute paper on 3 sources of information they think they will use for their brief.  After presenting sources, have them re-write their one minute paper to reflect what they have learned.

Ongoing “Fidelity” feedback throughout brief.

  • Frequent- direct interaction with students in the classroom after each section
  • Immediate- direct discussion of students’ questions/conclusions in the classroom.
  • Discriminating- focusing on how the information will be useful in their class NOW and future jobs
  • Lovingly delivered- Much less strict/rigid than most military interactions

After presenting the Source Evaluation Rubric, assign a site to each student, and have them assess it using the rubric.  Then, have them discuss the sites as a group and rank them from 1-5 in order of appropriateness for the topic.

After presenting helpful sources for copyright & citations, have students use one of the citation sources to create a citation for their Source Evaluation site. Discuss.

Instruction Evaluation: Have students complete a paper survey on the effectiveness of the brief.

Learning Theory:

Constructivism: A philosophy of learning founded on the premise that, by reflecting on our experiences, we construct our own understanding of the world we live in. Each of us generates our own “rules” and “mental models,” which we use to make sense of our experiences. Learning, therefore, is the process of adjusting our mental models to accommodate new experience. Learners construct their own meaning. Students do not process or transfer what they receive passively. Provide tasks that allow them to reflect/analyze on information. e.g. Search this index on X and list techniques that improve your search. New learning builds on prior knowledge. Students must compare and contrast old and new information to build new connections. Learning is enhanced by social interaction. Students learn best in social settings where they can debate conflicting ideas and exchange perspectives. e.g. Use small groups and class discussion to explore and articulate search processes and methods. When students work together on projects or problems under the guidance of the instructor, a higher level of learning is achieved due to the scaffolding effect of peers and teacher than could be accomplished independently. This is also known as Vygotsky’s “zone of proximal development”. Meaningful learning develops through “authentic” tasks. Choose examples and activities from the real world that are worthy of investigation. Consider current news topics or themes of interest to specific age groups.Draw on communication between participants through bulletin boards, chat, listservs, to share understanding from different points of view.

Reflection:

The most useful part was a format to follow when designing instruction.  Its nice to have an order to think about things, which helps make sure you don’t leave an important aspect out.  Overall, it was a nice refresher for me for learning theories and instructional techniques, and to think on how to teach adult learners.  It has made me miss teaching!  In the future I will be looking for more opportunities to present library instruction.


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Week 4

What technologies (and these can be old, new, or emerging) might be most appropriate for your final project? Does your final project align with any of the trends represented in the Horizon Report you reviewed? Now answer the first two questions posed in Consider section of the 5-Step Ed-Tech Integration Model from the How to Choose article.

Technologies/Tools:

  • Computer/projector
  • Powerpoint slides- a staple in the military
  • Library website
  • Pen & paper

As a one-shot instruction, with limited time, I want to keep things simple, and be able to demonstrate sites and tools that will best aid my students.  Sometimes the computer and internet don’t work quite right- so I am hesitant to use other technologies that depend on the computer being completely up to date.

Considerwill this application/tool enhance, improve instruction or motivate learners? What similar applications/tools are there to consider?

If I had more reliable tools I’d be interested in using:

  • Prezi, as an alternative to Powerpoint


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Week 3 Post 2

Motivation

Write a brief post addressing how you are going to motivate your learners/students, and align your response with the information drawn from Small’s article on motivation.
Motivation
Beginning:
  1. Share your objectives of the instruction (Relevance: goal orientation)
  2. Start with a search scenario most students are familiar with (how to find a book in the library (Relevance: familiarity)
  3. Assure students that they don’t have to memorize everything in the brief- just ask for my help and I’ll work with you one-on-one anytime. (Confidence: learning requirements)
During:
  1. After demonstrating on the smart board, have students pause and write, discuss as a group, and share ideas. (Attention: variability)
  2. Provide opportunities for students to practice with the demonstrated sites (Confidence: success opportunities)


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Week 3 Post 1

In your blog, discuss which theory/ies might be most applicable to your instruction and outline a specific activity/assignment/exercise that would facilitate learning according to that theory. Outline, design, or wireframe that activity in a way that  makes sense to you so you will be able to design it more in depth when you have time.
Theory:
Constructivism: A philosophy of learning founded on the premise that, by reflecting on our experiences, we construct our own understanding of the world we live in. Each of us generates our own “rules” and “mental models,” which we use to make sense of our experiences. Learning, therefore, is the process of adjusting our mental models to accommodate new experience.
Learners construct their own meaning. Students do not process or transfer what they receive passively. Provide tasks that allow them to reflect/analyze on information. e.g. Search this index on X and list techniques that improve your search.

New learning builds on prior knowledge. Students must compare and contrast old and new information to build new connections.

Learning is enhanced by social interaction. Students learn best in social settings where they can debate conflicting ideas and exchange perspectives. e.g. Use small groups and class discussion to explore and articulate search processes and methods. When students work together on projects or problems under the guidance of the instructor, a higher level of learning is achieved due to the scaffolding effect of peers and teacher than could be accomplished independently. This is also known as Vygotsky’s “zone of proximal development”.

Meaningful learning develops through “authentic” tasks. Choose examples and activities from the real world that are worthy of investigation. Consider current news topics or themes of interest to specific age groups.Draw on communication between participants through bulletin boards, chat, listservs, to share understanding from different points of view.

ACTIVITY:
1) Draw on what students already know- ask them what 3 sites they are planning to use for research.
2) Share sites with group/class.  Discuss any known pros and cons as a group.
3) Have instructor share vetted sites as an expert. Use sites and search terms directly from students/course topics.
4) Discuss questions, pros and cons, etc as a group.
5) Have students re-list three sites that they can use for research.  Give them time to explore these sites in class and to discuss findings with instructor and other students.